Wednesday, May 29, 2019 • 10:45 - 12:15
Track 5 – Education & Top Education Innovation Abstract Competition
Track Chair: Dr. Teresa Chan

Quick Tips for Teaching Flow in the ED - Dr. Teresa Chan

Description: Dr. Chan will review some of the latest evidence for teaching trainees to flow within the chaotic environment of the emergency department.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the precursors to managing multiple patients.
  2. Identify at least 1 new technique they can apply to teaching flow in their next shift.
  3. Identify one new paper they can read on this topic.

Pearls

  1. As EDs get busier, we need to develop new competencies – learning to flow an ED is one of these new skills.
  2. Before they can balance multiple patients, they must understand how each individual patient “moves” in the department.
  3. Learning ED flow can be scaffolded by cognitive apprenticeship – don’t just take care of issues behind trainees’ backs, make sure to involve them in some way (e.g. role-modelling, “what if?”, invite them to trouble shoot with you).

Dr. Chan is a clinician educator, medical education researcher, and social media maven. She can be found on Twitter as @TChanMD, tweeting about #MedEd and #MedTwitter.

Learning Science - Dr. Tamara McColl

Description:

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

Pearls

Feedback Science: Providing Effective Feedback for Moving Learners Forward - Dr. Lynsey Martin

Description: This session will highlight evidence-based strategies for delivering meaningful feedback to learners in the era of competency-based medical education.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Evaluate examples of feedback delivered to learners.
  2. Identify the key elements of a feedback dialogue.
  3. Review the importance of a feedback action plan.

Pearls

  1. Include a learner self-assessment as part of your feedback dialogue.
  2. Base feedback on direct observation & deliver it using neutral language for delivery.
  3. Conclude a feedback conversation with an action plan for improvement.

Recently completed her FRCPC-EM training (June 2018). Currently works as an ER physician in Saskatoon and Regina and is the Assistant Program Director and Competency-Based Medical Education Lead for the University of Saskatchewan Emergency Medicine training program.

Debate – Resilience vs. Systems Change- Drs. Erica Dance, Kaif Pardhan, Heather Murray, Alim Pardhan

Description: A discussion of resident wellness examining the different strategies that have been previously discussed. Specifically – Improving Resilience and Grit in Trainees vs. System Changes. As the health care system continues to be stretched and pushed to (and past) capacity, be it resolved that resilience and grit is more important than system changes when considering resident wellness.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Increase awareness of the issue of trainee burnout.
  2. Examine strategies to increase resilience and wellness training for trainees.
  3. Examine strategies for system change to reduce burnout in trainees.

Team Resilience

Erica Dance is an Emergency Physician at Royal Alexandra Hospital; Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine; Assistant Dean, Resident & Fellow Affairs, Office of Advocacy & Wellbeing, Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Alberta

Team Resilience

Kaif is an Emergency Physician at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and McMaster Children’s Hospital. He is the Assistant Program Director for the FRCPC EM Program at the University of Toronto and the Director of Clinical Operations for the Sunnybrook Emergency Department.

Team Systems

Heather Murray is an Associate Professor at Queen’s. She is an emergency physician and medical educator, teaching diagnostic reasoning and Evidence-Based Medicine to medical students and residents.

Team Systems

Alim is an Emergency Physician in Hamilton, Ontario. He is the Program Director for the FRCPC EM Program at Mac and Site Chief for the Hamilton General Hospital ED.

Top 3 Education Innovation Abstract Competition

Description: The top 3 education innovation abstracts will be presented by study authors. In this interactive session, presentations will be judged by a panel of EM educators, and the audience will be polled to determine the Top CAEP Education Innovation Abstract Award winner.

Presenters

11:45 – 11:55 LO83 – Quick Refresher Sessions (QRS): improving chest compression training for medical students Mr. Alexander Cormier
11:55 – 12:05 LO84 – Ready to Run the Show: Development of a New Instrument for Assessing Resident Competence in the Emergency Department Dr. Warren Cheung
12:05 – 12:15 LO85 – Development of a competency based assessment tool for emergency department point of care ultrasound Dr. Conor McKaigney

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Know about the most interesting and impactful innovations in EM education in Canada.
  2. Consider implementing similar innovations in their own program or context.
  3. Gain a better understanding of types scholarship as it relates to education innovation and research.

Pearls

  1. Education Innovations may fit within multiple categories of scholarship: discovery, application, integration, and teaching.
  2. Education Innovation reports should include a description of the problem and its importance, successes and failures of implementation, an evaluation of the innovation, and its impact.
  3. Glassick’s criteria can be used to evaluate scholarship relating to education innovations: Clear Goals, Adequate Preparation, Appropriate Methods, Significant Results, Effective Presentation, Reflective Critique

Judge

Daniel Ting is a PGY-5 Emergency Medicine resident physician at the University of British Columbia (Interior Site). He was the 2017-18 CanadiEM Digital Scholars Fellow and the inaugural Editorial Intern at the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Judge

Dr. Chan is a clinician educator, medical education researcher, and social media maven. She can be found on Twitter as @TChanMD, tweeting about #MedEd and #MedTwitter.

Judge

Dr. Andrew K. Hall is an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine (EM) at Queen’s University where he is the Competency-Based Medical Education (CBME) Lead for the FRCPC-EM training program. Additionally, he is a Clinician Educator at the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada.