Sunday, May 26, 2019 • 10:15 - 11:45
Track 4 - Trauma: Reanimated, Re-educated, Resequenced and Redesigned
Track Chairs: Dr. James French & Dr. Rob Green
Room: Argyle Suite (A1-A3)

Sim Demonstration - Trauma Team

Description: The goal of this session is to bring learning to life.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Know about sequencing of trauma interventions.
  2. Know about team leadership.
  3. Know how to develop an ergonomic trauma room.

Order Matters: Optimizing Trauma Resuscitation - Dr. Andrew Petrosoniak

Description: Time to turn ATLS upside down. Advances in trauma resuscitation require a focus on physiologic priorities and logistical efficiencies. This talk will provide an evidence-informed update to optimize the care of your next trauma patient.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how to align key steps in trauma resuscitation to align with physiologic priorities.
  2. Dispel myths associated with the ABCDE approach to trauma resuscitation.
  3. Describe a resequenced approach to trauma resuscitation that optimizing efficiency

Pearls

  1. The sequence of trauma resuscitation should follow the patient’s physiologic priorities.
  2. Resuscitate before intubation in most patients.
  3. First address any immediate threats to life: 1) critical airway compromise 2) massive external hemorrhage

Dr. Petrosoniak is an emergency physician and trauma team leader at St. Michael’s Hospital. He’s an assistant professor at the University of Toronto. His clinical focus is trauma resuscitation and massive transfusions in critically injured patients. His research focuses on using in situ simulation to improve patient safety and optimizing skill acquisition of rarely performed procedures. More recently, he’s applying simulation to inform design within newly constructed clinical environments.

No Time, No Stuff, No Compromise - Dr. Marietjie Slabbert

Description: Managing major trauma is a battle against time and against death. What you do in those first moments can have a lasting effect. It’s not about the fancy toys, but about getting the basics right – doing intense stuff quickly with limited resources. Lessons I learned from years of prehospital care that help my initial trauma management.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Create an appreciation of how time sensitive trauma can be.
  2. Know how to get things right with little to no equipment and a small team.
  3. Discuss the value of team training and synergy.

Pearls

  1. Prioritise.
  2. Do the basics well.
  3. Think 5-10 minutes ahead: What’s next.

Intensivist, Anesthesiologist, Regional Medical Director of Critical Care Programme Northern BC with a keen interest in trauma and prehospital care. South African born, British trained, living the Canadian adventure.

Tubes and Holes: Design and Deliberate Practice - Dr. James French

Description: How to be a trauma procedure bad-ass.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Know about Ergonomic Trauma Design.
  2. Know how to learn trauma skills.

Trauma Beyond the Trauma Bay: What Happens After Our Patients Leave the ED? - Dr. Rob Green

Description: “What happened to our patient from last night?” EM physicians and allied health providers often have little contact with patients after trauma resuscitation in the ED. Although the ED phase of care is essential patient survival, its only 1% of the story. Let’s dig into the rest of it.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Review the post-trauma ED care after admission.
  2. Briefly review fluids and vasopressors (yes, vasopressors!) use in trauma patents.
  3. Dispel the pessimism often present in “non-survivable” injuries.

Pearls

  1. Never hear “I wasn’t told about all of that” again: direct communication with the ICU service.
  2. Don’t write them off: what may seem grim in the trauma room “commonly” turns into pretty good outcomes.
  3. Smart docs can indeed figure out when the right time to use vasopressors in trauma patients.