Tuesday, May 28, 2019 • 15:00 - 16:30
Track 4 - Disaster (1)
Track Chair: Dr. Carl Jarvis
Room: 201

MCI Patient Tracking from the Scene to Hospital Discharge: Mission Impossible? - Dr. Val Homier

Description: An overview of current mass casualty incident (MCI) patient tracking methods and their shortcomings as well as initiatives to improve patient tracking in MCI situations.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe different mass casualty incident (MCI) patient tracking methods that are currently used.
  2. Present alternate methods or initiatives aiming to provide improved patient tracking in MCI situation.

Pearls

  1. The increased use of electronic Emergency Department patient information systems and other hospital electronic patient systems requires an investment in time and resources to develop adequate patient tracking methods in hospitals.
  2. The ideal patient tracking method will track patients from the scene of a MCI all the way to hospital discharge in real time and facilitate the search for family members & friends.

Dr. Valerie Homier practices Emergency Medicine at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal, Canada. She was appointed Co-Medical Director of Emergency Preparedness at the MUHC in 2017. Dr. Homier completed the European Masters of Disaster Medicine program in 2018. She frequently serves as an advisor and emergency preparedness expert on different projects at regional and provincial levels.

Establishing Governance of Emergency Management at the Hospital Level - Dr. Andrew Wilmore

Description: How one institution transformed it’s approach to Emergency Management and why yours should too.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Know about how we have structured ourselves at The Ottawa Hospital.
  2. Know about pragmatic policy design and support for the front lines.
  3. Know about interoperability and interface with external partners.
  4. Know how to fight passive indifference – lessons from the trenches.

Pearls

  1. Principles of Emergency Management and how it works at The Ottawa Hospital.
  2. How to bring forward ideas, change people’s minds and get them to work for you.
  3. Lessons from the trenches: how to drive change in fiscally challenging times. Case #1: Bus vs Train, Case #2: Bus vs Barrier.

Dr. Willmore is an attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Ottawa Hospital, where he holds an academic appointment with the University of Ottawa. He is the Medical Director for the Department of Emergency Management and an Associate Medical Director for the Regional Paramedic Program for Eastern Ontario. His operational and academic interests include developing interprofessional training curricula, prehospital and disaster medicine, as well as regional emergency planning for first receivers.

Debate: In-House Decon: Do It Yourself or Leave It to the Pros? - Drs. Andrew Wilmore, Val Homier, Carl Jarvis (moderator)

Description: A spirited debate on whether EDs should invest resources in providing decontamination capabilities or simply keep contaminated casualties from entering the ED until someone else (ie Fire Department Hazmat Team) has decontaminated them.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the options for decontaminating contaminated casualties.
  2. Describe the requirements for a functioning ED Decon Team.

Pearls

  1. Hazmat decon capability requires dedicated space, equipment and infrastructure, purchasing PPE, team organisation, and training (and retraining) staff.
  2. Technical decontamination of high acuity ED patients requires commitment by the ED and support from the hospital.

Dr. Valerie Homier practices Emergency Medicine at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal, Canada. She was appointed Co-Medical Director of Emergency Preparedness at the MUHC in 2017. Dr. Homier completed the European Masters of Disaster Medicine program in 2018. She frequently serves as an advisor and emergency preparedness expert on different projects at regional and provincial levels.

Dr. Jarvis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, the Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness at EHS (The NS EMS agency), and the Executive Director of The Centre for Excellence in Emergency Preparedness.

Debate: MCI Triage: START or CTAS? - Drs. Daniel Kollek, Vered Gazit, Carl Jarvis (moderator)

Description: A spirited debate on the best triage method in a disaster.

Learning Objectives
At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Know the components of START triage.
  2. Know the components of CTAS triage.
  3. Know the specific triage issues in MCIs.

Pearls

  1. Simple fast replicable triage is a key component to MCI response.

Dr. Kollek is an award winning Emergency Physician, an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Section of Emergency Medicine at McMaster University, Chair of the CAEP Disaster Committee and past Executive Director of the Centre for Excellence in Emergency Preparedness.

Dr. Gazit is Pediatric Emergency Physician at IWK Health Centre, an Associate Professor in the Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine at Dalhousie University. Director of the Dalhousie Pediatric Emergency Medicine Simulation Program and a Disaster Management Liaison at IWK Health Centre. Former co-chair of the Pediatric Emergency and Disaster Medicine Track at the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM).

Dr. Jarvis is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Dalhousie University in Halifax, the Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness at EHS (The NS EMS agency), and the Executive Director of The Centre for Excellence in Emergency Preparedness.