Old Docs Rule

Old Docs Rule! CAEP salutes our senior emergency physicians across the country. Join us at the “Wisdom” track at CAEP 2018 in Calgary.

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Dr. Ian Stiell
Age: > 60 years
Ottawa, ON
As someone who started working in the ED forty years ago, I remain convinced that emergency medicine is a very exciting and rewarding field, and is hard to beat!

Dr. Bruce Mohr
Age: 60 years
Whistler, BC
ED docs get to practice the art of medicine. It’s not just what we do, but how we do it. Enhance your patients’ experience and your sense of fulfillment.

Dr. Howard Ovens
Age: 62 years
Toronto, ON
At 62 years of age, and after 35 years in the ED at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, I’m still having fun, still learning, and truly believe “there’s no life like it!”

Dr. Eric Letovsky
Age: 65 years
Toronto, ON
After 37 years of practice, the basic principles are even more important than ever: wash your hands, explain in detail what is going to happen, and be nice to patients.

Dr. Ken Buchanan
Age: 68 years
Victoria, BC
One really great thing about being a “seasoned” (old) ED doc is that I am still very skilled at performing many currently useless procedures (intra-cardia epi injections in cardiac arrests, rotating tourniquest/phlebotomies for acute pulmonary edema, diagnostic peritoneal lavage in blunt abdominal trauma, etc.)

Dr. Alan Drummond
Age: 63 years
Perth, ON
Emergency medicine is a service industry. If each individual patient isn’t your first priority, why are you working in the ED?

Dr. Fran Crawford
Age: 60 years
Kingston, ON
Regardless of how packed your waiting room, how full your hallways, or how much pressure is on you to not do a test or admit a patient, care for every patient before you as if they are your only one. They will be appreciative when they sense that their needs are what matter at this moment.

Dr. Rod McFadyen
Age: 64 years
Victoria, BC
Over the course of a 40 year career I have watched emergency medicine transform from docs doing moonlight shifts to being some of the brightest lights in the worlds of clinical care, academics and quality improvement.

Dr. Jane Moran
Age: 65 years
Victoria, BC
Emergency medicine is a specialty for those who seek a career of continued learning, countless conundrums, plenty of hard work, and endless rewards.

Dr. Glenn Ashmead
Age: 69 years
Victoria, BC
One of my key instructions to residents was as follows: “You have sufficient knowledge and skill…just bloody decide and get it done!”

Dr. Jill McEwen
Age: ≤ 60 years
Vancouver, BC

After over 30 years of practice, would I do it over again? Absolutely! My 3 secrets for a long and rewarding career:

  1. Enjoy your patients & your team: there’s something good in everyone – find it!
  2. Take care of yourself: work hard, play hard & sleep well.
  3. Diversify: pursue other career interests to balance out your clinical work.

Dr. Jim Goulding
Age: 61 years
Victoria, BC
To be given the chance to experience and teach this crazy life of emergency medicine is truly special.

Dr. Bob Penner
Age: 63 years
Victoria, BC
Let’s make this better.

Dr. Charlie Ricketson
Age: 62 years
Victoria, BC
Emergency medicine is like radiation: there is a lifetime dose that the body can tolerate, you can jam it all into 7 years or spread it out over a 35 year career. Pick one.

Dr. David Walker
Age: 70 years
Kingston, ON
I appreciate that the knowledge and skills hard-learned in the ED equipped me for many other roles and jobs, and my patients taught me about the world as it is.

Dr. Victor Wood
Age: 70 years
Victoria, BC
Loved emergency medicine for forty years…..enjoying retirement more.

Dr. Ron Siemens
Age: 60 years
Saskatoon, SK

Pediatric emergency: kindness, passion, patience and a dollop of adrenaline. What a privilege.

Dr. Miguel Lipka
Age: 70 years
Saanich, BC
A wise ERP once said: Two things to keep in mind. A) Listen with patience, do not interrupt the flow (watch for the proverbial 20 seconds…). B) It takes the same amount of time to think “Should I do a head to toe exam on this patient?” than to actually do it…so it is your choice.

Dr. Elspeth Kushnir
Age: 68 years
Meaford, ON
42 years of ED experience has not exhausted my passion for seeing and treating patients. Advancing technology has increased our ability to “see” beneath the surface of the patient and to identify pathology. But, still, the real art and satisfaction in this profession is to SEE the person and connect to them in order to help.

Dr. Ron Youngash
Age: 69 years
Victoria, BC
Emergency medicine? A profession, a team and a mindset!

Dr. Christine Johns
Age: 60 years
Ottawa, ON
As a medical student, the emergency was the only place doctors seemed alive in the moment to treat what the patient actually needed treated. I still love the ED for the same reason: we don’t choose our patients nor the agenda. We have to think on our feet to deliver solutions to whatever surprise issues suddenly appear in front of us. ED medicine never gets old, even though we do!

Dr. John Tallon
Age: 60 years
Vancouver, BC
Remember that emergency medicine is a movable feast; use it to see the country and the world!

Dr. Chris Rumball
Age: 67 years
Nanaimo, BC
Your sidekick computer lacks initiative, empathy, understanding and wisdom. That’s for you to provide. Ask your patients the right questions. Computers are useless, they only have answers.

Dr. Shawn Spelliscy
Age: 65 years
Kelowna, BC
All of us old docs were told at one time or another that we would not last in this specialty. They would suggest to come try this or that. But, thanks to great mentorship and training, emergency medicine turned out to be the best specialty in medicine!

Dr. Paul Patey
Age: ≥ 70 years
St. John’s, NL
I always told my students: ask the general question to get the specific answer.

Dr. Joel Lexchin
Age: 69 years
Toronto, ON
I stumbled into emergency medicine in 1982 and have never had a regret. It’s a great life and an honour to help people when they need it the most.

Dr. Connie LeBlanc
Age: 60ish years
Halifax, NS
The practice of Emergency Medicine gives us all backstage pass to life. We see and experience things others do not and cannot. Some are terrible and soul crushing while others leave us in aw. It’s a ride!

Dr. David Rhine (AKA Rhino)
Age: 65 years
Kelowna, BC
I’m 38 years into this career and still learning. Over the years my best teachers have been my patients, from whom I continue to learn on a daily basis. To many mentors, THANK YOU!….especially to Dr. Bob Boyd and the original Holy Cross ED group who led me into such an exciting, challenging, rewarding career.

Dr. Sam Campbell
Age: 60ish  years
Halifax, NS
After 30 years, the only thing that I am certain of when I start a shift is that I will see something that I have never seen before…

Dr. Steven Thicke
Age: 64 years
Saanich, BC
I came to full time EM later in my career and it was a refreshing transition for me. My somewhat lighter schedule of late continues to challenge and stimulate so I guess I’m not quite done yet! The grey actually predates the wrinkles and is mostly of rural OB origin…

Dr. Jan Ahuja
Age: 67 years
Ottawa, ON
As I have often said to a generation of residents in EM, “when all else fails, talk to the patient!” Despite an explosion of available investigations and therapies in the 40 years that I have been involved in emergency medicine, a careful history usually provides the clues to an elusive diagnosis.